Patterson Thuente News


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Law Students RSVP by 1/18 – IP Career Prep Event!

There’s still time to RSVP for Patterson Thuente’s IP Career Prep Event. Our attorneys will give you tips for improving your resume, conduct mock job interviews and answer your questions about the IP law profession. Email Pat Girod to save your spot: girod@ptslaw.com
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Defining “seller” for copyright infringement liability

What’s a copyright holder to do when counterfeit products show up on the massive online marketplace Amazon.com? Well, one thing it will have trouble doing is successfully suing Amazon for infringement, as seen in Milo & Gabby LLC v. Amazon.com, Inc.

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China & India take steps to make software patenting easier

China and India recently revised their patent office guidelines for the examination of software-related inventions. In both cases the guidelines broaden the scope of patent eligible subject matter and generally create a positive climate for patenting software-related inventions.

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Charlie Nelson Joins Patterson Thuente IP

Patterson Thuente IP welcomes patent attorney Charlie Nelson who joins the firm as an associate. Charlie has been part of the team since 2015 as a participant in out law clerk program. He will support our clients in the medical device and consumer products industries. Learn more about Charlie!  
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A road map for patent obviousness

It probably comes as no surprise that inventions that are obvious aren’t eligible for patents. Yet arguments over obviousness land in the court all the time. A recent ruling by the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals (which hears all patent-related appeals) in Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc. v. Sandoz Inc. illustrates several arguments that can arise when the obviousness of an invention — and therefore the validity of its patent — is at issue.

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SCOTUS clarifies doctrine limiting patent rights

Exhausted yet? Anyone who has ever tried to avoid the high prices of toner cartridges by purchasing refills from so-called remanufacturers will be interested in a recent ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court — and many patentees should be interested, too. In Impression Products, Inc. v. Lexmark Int’l, Inc., the Court provided some important clarifications to the patent exhaustion doctrine that limits a patentee’s rights.

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Supreme Court disparages ban on offensive trademarks

What’s offensive is often in the eye of the beholder. Where federal trademark registration is sought, this has long meant that registration could be denied if the mark was considered disparaging. Now, in a landmark 8-0 decision in Matal v. Tam, the U.S. Supreme Court has struck down the so-called “disparagement clause” in federal trademark law, opening the door to the registration of marks that may have been rejected as offensive in the past.

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Ideas on Intellectual Property Law – Year End 2017

Patterson Thuente IP is pleased to present the Year End 2017 issue of Ideas on Intellectual Property Law. We encourage you to read through it for ideas on how to best protect your intellectual property.

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Coding error: Court rejects software patent

Oops — they did it again. The Federal Circuit Court of Appeals has rejected yet another software patent. The court, which hears all appeals involving patents, found that the patent was for a patent-ineligible invention.

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SCOTUS limits venue for patent lawsuits

In a landmark decision, the U.S. Supreme Court has dramatically tightened the restrictions on where patent owners can file infringement lawsuits. The court’s unanimous ruling is expected to rein in the “forum shopping” that so often occurs in patent infringement cases, where patentees try to file in judicial districts considered to be more plaintiff-friendly, such as the defendant-dreaded Eastern District of Texas.

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