Category Archive for "Patent Law"

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Federal Circuit confirms expansion of liability for divided patent infringement

Patentees have long struggled when trying to enforce method patents in “divided infringement” cases, where multiple parties carried out the required steps. The Federal Circuit Court of Appeals seems to have come to their rescue, though. The court, which hears all appeals in patent-related cases, recently made clear that it’s applying a looser standard when it comes to establishing direct infringement liability in divided infringement cases.

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Patterson Thuente Listed on 2018 IAM Patent 1000

We are proud to be listed among the top patent firms in the world in this year’s IAM Patent 1000 for the sixth year in a row. Patterson Thuente appears in the prestigious publication, published by Globe Business Media Group of London, as one of the world’s leading patent service providers. IAM is acknowledged within the industry as the leading IP business media platform. Patterson Thuente was included in the IAM Patent 1000 2018 publication as a recommended firm for both litigation and prosecution. Four attorneys – Eric Chadwick, Jim Patterson, Brad Pedersen, and Amy Salmela – were also recognized for their individual talents.

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The Supreme Court and IPRs – a Mixed and Messy Bag of Results

In the Oil States decision handed down today, Justice Thomas authored the 7-2 majority decision affirming the constitutionality of IPR proceedings over challenges based on Article III separation of powers and the 7th Amendment Right to Trial by Jury.  Depending upon which camp you are in, this will be seen as either generally favorable (petitioners) or generally unfavorable (patent owners).

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Proving infringement of system patents: Court rejects jury’s infringement finding in phone case

You might think it would be easier to prove infringement of a patented system having multiple components. The more parts, the more opportunity to prove infringement. Not so. As one patentee learned the hard way, more parts means more to prove.

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Beat it! Heart disease diagnostic isn’t patent-eligible

Inventors in the pursuit of “personalized medicine” patents were likely discouraged by the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals’ ruling in The Cleveland Clinic Foundation v. True Health Diagnostics LLC, which involved a diagnostic method. The court’s ruling highlights the difficulty of obtaining patents for such methods.

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Failure to prove obviousness revives patent application

A patent applicant’s first round of appeals is to the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB). But if a patent applicant receives a negative ruling from the PTAB, it isn’t necessarily the end of the road. The Federal Circuit Court of Appeals made that clear in a case where it faulted the Board for failing to adequately lay out just why an invention was obvious and therefore unpatentable.

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China & India take steps to make software patenting easier

China and India recently revised their patent office guidelines for the examination of software-related inventions. In both cases the guidelines broaden the scope of patent eligible subject matter and generally create a positive climate for patenting software-related inventions.

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A road map for patent obviousness

It probably comes as no surprise that inventions that are obvious aren’t eligible for patents. Yet arguments over obviousness land in the court all the time. A recent ruling by the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals (which hears all patent-related appeals) in Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc. v. Sandoz Inc. illustrates several arguments that can arise when the obviousness of an invention — and therefore the validity of its patent — is at issue.

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SCOTUS clarifies doctrine limiting patent rights

Exhausted yet? Anyone who has ever tried to avoid the high prices of toner cartridges by purchasing refills from so-called remanufacturers will be interested in a recent ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court — and many patentees should be interested, too. In Impression Products, Inc. v. Lexmark Int’l, Inc., the Court provided some important clarifications to the patent exhaustion doctrine that limits a patentee’s rights.

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Coding error: Court rejects software patent

Oops — they did it again. The Federal Circuit Court of Appeals has rejected yet another software patent. The court, which hears all appeals involving patents, found that the patent was for a patent-ineligible invention.

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